A Volunteer

I don’t remember when I first started noticing them in the fields and along the roads, whether here in West Virginia or perhaps elsewhere some time in the past, but I have been attracted to their charming yellow flowers and soft green foliage. From time to time I have thought, I should just dig one of those up for our yard. But there was never an opportunity — no place to park the car, or the flowers were too far out in a field.

While weeding this spring I noticed an interesting plant in the fence row along Hartland. It seemed vaguely familiar, so I decided that even though I didn’t know what it was I should let it grow. Maybe it would be something pretty. Or maybe not. And if not, I could just pull it up later.

Common Evening-Primrose (Oenothera biennis)

Common Evening-Primrose (Oenothera biennis)

And then it bloomed.

I’m glad I let it grow, and I didn’t even have to steal it from a field!

Common Evening-Primrose (Oenothera biennis) backed by a chorus of hybrid Daylilies (Hemerocallis)

Common Evening-Primrose (Oenothera biennis) backed by a chorus of hybrid Daylilies (Hemerocallis)

The flowers may not be spectacular, but they’re pretty, and the plant makes a nice addition in its place in the yard. Maybe next year there will be more of them.

Common Evening-Primrose (Oenothera biennis).

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Butcher’s Blood?

Found at Metal Ford along the Natchez Trace Parkway, 3 April 2018.

Red Trillium

Red Trillium

This appears to my untrained eye to be a Trillium recurvatum, also known as Prairie Trillium, Red Trillium, or Butcher’s blood, among other names. For more description, see www.illinoiswildflowers.info/woodland/plants/pr_trillium.htm